You’ve missed a bit …

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Who are your Construction Heroes?

first_imgConstruction should be known for its talented and diverse workforce, according to the government’s industrial strategy.Launching the strategy last month, business minister Michael Fallon set out a series of highly ambitious targets for construction and also criticised the sector’s current performance in areas such as the efficiency of its supply chain and its apparent lack of ambition in terms of overseas growth.But we know that the industry is actually excelling in many instances, and that much of that success is led by the very same talented people the strategy suggests are not being publicly recognised.To put this right, we’d like you to tell us more by nominating your construction hero – not established leaders or well-known figures in the sector, but unsung heroes who deserve acclaim.Who do you think is performing exceptionally but remains below the radar? Who is going above and beyond what is required in their role to really make a difference? Their success could be happening in any area of construction but might be furthering sustainability, design, health and safety, innovation, opportunity for newcomers to the sector, community engagement or efficient delivery.We’d like you to name your nominee and where they work and explain in fewer than 300 words why they deserve this title either by commenting on this story or by emailing building@ubm.com. Please include your own name and contact details.Once you’ve done that, please tweet about your nomination using #ConstructionHeroes so we can start to give these people some recognition!last_img read more

Two sheets of A4 BIM please

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

It’s easier when you stop saying BIM

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Government has quietly unlocked a £900m energy efficiency pipeline

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Little Britain Challenge Cup: Day one

first_imgToday marked the start of the Little Britain Challenge Cup in Cowes. With 60 yachts racing over the next few days, the test race saw the start of the camaraderie and competitive spirit that comes with the largest property and construction industry sailing regatta.A pontoon party sponsored by Asite started the networking and brought the first of the party spirit. The sentiment here is positive and upbeat. Little Britain attracts a range of businesses, from developers and investors to architects, construction companies, advisers and product suppliers. Regardless of what role they play in the industry, there’s a recognition that we’re not back on solid ground but we’re heading in the right direction – there’s work to be had.Throughout the course of the evening, more people arrived to be part of the official race today. Some people weren’t so keen on the queues that Bestival created in Southampton so decided to make their own way over – returning competitor Assael Architecture hired a rib for its whole team. Like Domus, and befitting Building’s number one employer from the latest annual Good Employer Guide, they’re using Little Britain for some quality team building.Whether its team building or client entertainment, there’s an excitement in the air and, as we wake to the second day, the sun is still shining. More from me later.Building is media partner for the Little Britain Challenge Cup.David Kong, marketing director at Domus and chairman of Little Britain Challenge Cuplast_img read more

How to improve a building’s EPC rating

first_imgIf proposed legislative changes come into play next year, buildings with an EPC rating of F or G will become unlawful. With this looming over the industry, and about 20% of non-domestic properties already in this bracket, energy saving measures need to be considered and implemented now. Thermal breaking technology could be the answer, but when is it better to demolish existing properties, and is the construction industry taking thermal breaking seriously enough in light of industry movements?Generally speaking, commercial properties and dwellings built before the 1980s have poor insulation qualities, and many contain dangerous substances such as asbestos. Although today’s buildings use more revolutionary materials to provide insulation, these energy saving methods can be made redundant if cold bridges within a building’s thermal envelope are not correctly isolated.In certain situations, depending on cost, using an effective thermal bridging solution can bring a dilapidated building back to life to meet the new EPC ratingsIn some cases, it is more cost effective to demolish a building and rebuild it completely, rather than update it with insulation solutions. Contractors will often come across projects where too much damage has been done to a structure due to lack of insulation, such as damp and mould issues, and unfortunately in these cases, demolition will be the best option. However, in certain situations, depending on cost, using an effective thermal bridging solution can bring a dilapidated building back to life to meet the new EPC ratings.In light of legislative changes, designers are being forced to consider solutions to protect buildings from falling into an F or G category, saving them from demolition or costly renovations. For example, when a building’s envelope is penetrated to attach cladding or an external fixture such as a balcony or masonry support, a thermal bridge can be created. Using a structural thermal break to thermally isolate the connection penetrating the building, effectively prevents any heat transfer.The characteristics of these materials include ultra-high strength fabric reinforced thermo setting resins, to combat long term creep under exceptional loads, and closed cell moulded polymer compounds to eradicate moisture absorption. Improved awareness of design coupled with thermal modelling can be used to save buildings already in this low rating category by updating the connection points where heat transfer occurs.Having these solutions available to contractors and architects is imperative for creating energy efficient structures for the future, whether they are being renovated or created from scratch. A correctly designed thermal break can offer up to an 80% reduction in heat loss, which can improve a building’s EPC rating dramatically, helping the 20% of commercial properties that currently fall into the F or G bracket.Although the changes for 2018 are only proposed, it is definitely a subject that all professionals in this construction field should be made aware of and actively work towards. The building industry has been showing sure signs of heading in the direction of creating a more sustainable future for construction by creating thermally isolated, efficient structures, while reducing carbon emissions as much as possible.Overall, the importance of creating thermally isolated buildings to reduce costs both in terms of energy and potentially expensive renovation projects, simply cannot be overlooked. Protecting structures designed by architects from being demolished or declared unlawful, is a huge part of the industry that needs to be focused on ahead of these changes. Making this information widely accessible to those who need it, is the first step in creating a more reliable and efficient future for the construction world as regulations become tighter.Jonathan Shaw, managing director of thermal breaks specialists Armadillolast_img read more

Hansom: Say cheese

first_imgDoing the roundsIn its interim results last week, piling specialist Van Elle flagged up the news that NG Bailey boss David Hurcomb had joined as a non-executive in November. Perhaps Hurcomb will be able to help Van Elle get back the £1.6m the firm says it is preparing to write off following Carillion’s collapse last month. After all, Hurcomb used to work at the bust contractor, stepping down as the director responsible for its UK building business in 2009. His replacement? Richard Howson, who later became chief executive and will be having to explain the whole sorry mess to MPs next Tuesday.Missing the boatI see that the Shipping Building in west London has been sold for £29m. An art deco gem, it was designed by Wallis, Gilbert & Partners and is part of the Old Vinyl Factory redevelopment – the former EMI record pressing plant being turned into offices, homes and retail by developer U+I. It’s now fully let, which is a disappointment because I rather fancied working there. “The Ship has now sailed,” U+I’s website tells me. I am quite saddened. Given that the plant pressed Pink Floyd records among others, Wish You Were Here seems more appropriate …The right skillsRedrow has unveiled plans for a three-year housebuilding degree it is launching in partnership with Liverpool John Moores University. The course starts later this year and promises “candidates a full overview of housebuilding skills” such as housebuilding quality, business skills and project management. Given the amount of flak some in the industry have been getting recently – step forward Persimmon – I am curious to see if a planned negotiation module will include a lesson on how to trouser a huge bonus.An uplifting storyThe escalator celebrated its 125th anniversary last month and we learned about a very niche area of history. The first ever escalator was installed at Iron Pier on Coney Island in New York. Inventor Jesse Reno’s design travelled at a 25° angle and carried 75,000 passengers in its first two weeks, who no doubt marvelled at this moving staircase. I’m afraid the novelty has long worn off for me, oppressed by years of travelling on London’s underground and having to stand on the right. The other day I was warned by a sign on the side that simply using an escalator meant a “danger of death”. Which made me think that our health and safety culture has, erm, escalated somewhat over the years.So good, they named it twice Could Brookfield be about to add another site to the list of schemes it is developing in the Square Mile? One of my hacks tells me that at a recent British Council for Offices dinner, the company was overheard expressing interest in the plans for 100 Leadenhall Street, which have been designed by architect SOM. The site is owned by a Hong Kong investor, and adviser London & Oriental, which is acting on behalf of the firm, has already talked it up as “one of the last significant sites available for development in the City’s eastern cluster”. The planned 56-storey skyscraper will have a slanting glass elevation resembling the Rogers Stirk Harbour-designed Cheesegrater next door. Inevitably, it has also been given its own nickname: the rather underwhelming Cheesegrater 2.0. Jacobs Cream Crackers anyone?#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# Grater goodI’ve been having a bit of a clear-out and came across this little gem. It’s a limited edition gift to mark the formal opening of the Leadenhall Building, better known as the Cheesegrater. It came in a special presentation case complete with fancy card. A mildly amusing gift, of course, and yet I fail to see any resemblance to the actual Cheesegrater now standing proudly in the City. In shape, I rather think the building resembles a wedge of Italian Parmesan rather than the kitchen appliance pictured. But perhaps “the slice of Parmesan” isn’t such a catchy name – and if the cheese in your fridge was that colour, it would certainly go in the bin. Still, at least there aren’t any bolts to fall off it.Send any juicy industry gossip to hansom@ubm.comlast_img read more

Data security: infrastructure lessons from Facebook

first_imgLOGIN or REGISTER for free access on selected stories and sign up for email alerts.Take out a print and online or online only subscription and you will get immediate access to:Breaking industry news as it happensExpert analysis and comment from industry leadersUnlimited access to all stories, including premium contentFull access to all our online archive Get access to premium content subscribe today LOGIN or REGISTER to access this storylast_img

RWE Innogy contracts Daewoo to build an offshore construction ship

first_imgThe contract also includes the option for two further identical construction ships. The value of the contract for each ship is around EUR100 million (USD148 million). The first ship should be completed in 2011. Prof. Fritz Vahrenholt, Chairman of the Board of Directors of RWE Innogy GmbH: “The building of our own construction ships will overcome one of the most important supply bottlenecks we face in the construction of wind farms at sea. These ships will give us a decisive time and cost advantage in the North Sea and further afield in implementing our ambitious plans to expand wind energy.” The ships ordered by RWE Innogy are the first of their type in the world. They are able to transport and install the largest available offshore wind turbines including foundations. With a length of 109 m and a width of 40 m, the ships can simultaneously transport and install up to four turbines in the multi-megawatt class. Featuring satellite control, these ships can be fixed with centimetre-precision for construction work at sea and operate in water depths of more than 40 m. “The construction ships of this special design are ideally suited to the construction of marine wind power plants. Unlike the vessels which were previously used, they are able to successfully install the largest wind turbines currently available in the 5 and 6 MW class even under the harsh conditions which are often encountered offshore,” underlines Prof. Martin Skiba, Head of Offshore Wind at RWE Innogy. The ship capacities commissioned in the course of a worldwide invitation for tender are intended for use in the construction of the offshore wind farms planned by RWE Innogy. The company currently has plans for two wind farms in the German part of the North Sea, namely “North Sea East” (295 megawatt) and “Innogy North Sea 1” (960 megawatt). Of the Welsh coast, RWE Innogy is planning construction of an offshore wind farm to be called “Gwynt y Môr” (576 megawatt). Only last week that the company commissioned the “Rhyl Flats” wind farm (90 MW) in Liverpool Bay off the Welsh coast. The company has already been operating the “North Hoyle” offshore wind park (60 MW) there since 2004. RWE Innogy also has a 50 percent share in the “Greater Gabbard” wind farm off the East coast of England. This wind farm is currently under construction and will have a total capacity of more than 500 MW on completion in 2011. Furthermore, RWE Innogy is involved in the construction of the first Belgian offshore wind farm, “Thornton Bank” (300 MW). The first expansion phase of this wind farm is already in commercial operation with an installed output of 30 MW.last_img read more