Ex-Im supports US exporters

first_imgThe measures include waivers, deadline extensions and streamlined processing, designed to allow business owners to focus on the attention on the health of their employees, without the worry of meeting Ex-Im’s deadlines. Introduced on March 12, the measures are in place for an initial 30-day period, with the possibility of further extension at Ex-Im’s discretion.  “We are working tirelessly to ensure our nation has the proper programmes in place to provide US exporters with the financing and other products necessary to export “Made in the USA” goods and services in the future,” said Ex-Im. In February, the bank approved 156 authorisations totalling USD258.5 million in support of American small businesses that export US-made products around the world. This total includes USD179.7 million of short-term authorisations and USD34.8 million of medium-term authorisations. “Given the current challenges related to the Covid-19 global pandemic and importance of supporting global trade and investment, Ex-Im stands ready to help our nation’s businesses and workers, especially America’s small businesses,” said Ex-Im president and chairman Kimberly A. Reed.  www.exim.govlast_img read more

Youth programmes hampered by crime

first_imgThe Young Mens Christian Association in Athlone has suffered attempted break-ins and robberies. A wave of crime is plaguing the YMCA in Athlone. Staff say attempted burglaries and robberies are keeping students away.YMCA runs a daily after-school programme for young people. Y-Zone activities include sports, arts and crafts, games, and life skills.They also run a hostel for pupils attending tertiary institutions. In the latest incident, two weeks ago, staff say two men jumped over the fence but then fled when they spotted the caretaker.Rudy October, the hostel co-ordinator at the YMCA, said there had been attempted burglaries nearly ever week since the start of the year. “They see us fixing the windows or doing renovations, and then they break in again. It really has become a norm now to the point where we don’t even report it anymore because it happens every week. Our students are so scared to come in the mornings or leave in the afternoons.”Ms October said pupils were being robbed from 7am to 8am in the morning and then again from 3pm to 5pm in the afternoons and were too afraid to lay charges. “The robbers say that they know they are from the Y and then rob them of their belongings. We had one pupil who was going to enrol and stay in the hostel and as he left he was mugged and threatened with a knife, and he didn’t come back. On the same day, another pupil who was already enrolled also got mugged in front of the premises.”Police were now patrolling the area regularly after she had reported the incidents to them, she said.Athlone police spokeswoman Sergeant Zita Norman said: “Students must be cautious when travelling. Every crime committed is taken seriously by police and will be followed up on. The crimes are recorded as part of our statistics so when it goes unreported in reflects false statistics for the area.” The Young Mens Christian Association in Athlone has suffered attempted break-ins and robberies. The Young Mens Christian Association in Athlone has suffered attempted break-ins and robberies.center_img 1 of 2last_img read more

Unsecured creditors ‘unlikely’ to recover £658k from firm

first_imgUnsecured creditors of a collapsed London firm – including staff owed redundancy and notice pay – are unlikely to recover a penny, it has been revealed.An administrator’s progress report for St John Law Limited, published this week with Companies House (pictured), show the firm owed £658,482 in unsecured debts to 11 creditors.The St Bride Street practice, which specialised in litigation and specifically legal advice for Irish developers affected by the collapse of the Irish economy, entered administration last October. It had no connection with St John Legal, which is a trading name of London firm City Law Firm Limited. A statement of administrator’s proposals published by the administrator Quantuma LLP in December showed the firm owed almost £20,000 in unpaid wages and holiday pay and around £135,000 for redundancy and notice pay. The second debt was classified as ‘unsecured’.Other unsecured creditors included HM Revenue & Customs (owed almost £600,000) and trade creditors, who are owed around ££82,000.Today’s update states that based on the information presently available, it is expected there is ‘unlikely to be distribution to unsecured creditors’.The company’s book debts at the time of administration were £226,537. Quantuma said that given the ‘significant costs and uncertainty’ associated with pursuing these debts, agreed settlements have been made with two debtors who will pay almost £73,000 in total.Administrators have collected book debts of £32,000 and, while further recovery is expected, ‘numerous queries’ have been raised in respect of outstanding debts.December’s report explained that the firm’s work depended on it acting on a deferred fee basis, with recovery of costs from the losing party taking several months or years.‘The uncertain timing and quantum of this work impacted on the company’s cashflow,’ said the report. ‘A number of matters proved not to be successful, the result being that vast amounts of costs were written off.’The firm had been involved in two major defended High Court disputes and at the time the petition to wind up was made last August it was involved in a trial lasting three weeks with costs and work in progress of £1m.The administrators have said their intention is to exit the administration by way of dissolution if there are no funds to distribute to unsecured creditors. This is likely to take effect in 14 days.Today’s report states that the administrators will charge remuneration of £35,500, with costs coming to almost £20,000. National firm Pinsent Masons has also incurred £57,000 in charges for its role in the administration.last_img read more

Litigation expert Stewarts Law sued over lapsed PI claim

first_imgTop-40 firm Fieldfisher has confirmed it has issued legal proceedings against litigation specialist Stewarts Law over the handling of a personal injury case.Bristol-born lorry driver Michael Howe, now 70, was represented until last year by Stewarts in a claim against the Motor Insurers Bureau following a road traffic accident in France ten years ago.Howe was left paralysed following the crash but has struggled to secure compensation ever since and was told last month by the Court of Appeal that his appeal had been dismissed.By the time of that hearing, Howe was represented by Fieldfisher, who applied for permission to amend the grounds of appeal, amend the particulars of claim and for permission to appeal in relation to amended material.In a judgment formally reported this week, Lord Justice Lloyd Jones expressed his sympathy for Howe but said he was bound by rules on limitation and that three relevant deadlines had been missed. The judge noted that the application of a French five-year limitation would not cause undue hardship, and he could not allow new points to be raised as that would represent ‘an act of extreme indulgence’.Jones added: ‘For Mr Howe there has been a decade of paraplegia without proper resolution of his claim. I cannot, however, allow my very real sympathy for him to cause me to make an order which does not reflect the applicable legal principles or to exercise discretion on that sympathy alone.’The judge said it would be difficult to allow an action to proceed when Howe has been represented since an early stage and no action was commenced within either three, five or six years – the length of time allowed by various statutes in different jurisdictions.Fieldfisher head of personal injury Jill Greenfield, who took over the case from Stewarts last year, said the lorry driver now stands to secure no compensation and potentially be hit with a six-figure legal bill. Jill GreenfieldFieldfisherShe confirmed proceedings have been issued against Stewarts Law, with the case run by senior associate Dushal Mehta and Elizabeth Ann Gumbel QC appointed as counsel.Greenfield added: ‘Mr Howe is in an incredibly difficult position. What should have been a fairly straightforward claim for compensation has ended up in the Court of Appeal ten years later.’ ‘Mr Howe, an extremely vulnerable man, has been left with no financial support for his disability following the accident and now faces a costs order against him amounting to hundreds of thousands of pounds.’Stewarts Law declined to comment as proceedings are ongoing.last_img read more

Litigation expert Stewarts Law sued over lapsed PI claim

first_imgTop-40 firm Fieldfisher has confirmed it has issued legal proceedings against litigation specialist Stewarts Law over the handling of a personal injury case.Bristol-born lorry driver Michael Howe, now 70, was represented until last year by Stewarts in a claim against the Motor Insurers Bureau following a road traffic accident in France ten years ago.Howe was left paralysed following the crash but has struggled to secure compensation ever since and was told last month by the Court of Appeal that his appeal had been dismissed.By the time of that hearing, Howe was represented by Fieldfisher, who applied for permission to amend the grounds of appeal, amend the particulars of claim and for permission to appeal in relation to amended material.In a judgment formally reported this week, Lord Justice Lloyd Jones expressed his sympathy for Howe but said he was bound by rules on limitation and that three relevant deadlines had been missed. The judge noted that the application of a French five-year limitation would not cause undue hardship, and he could not allow new points to be raised as that would represent ‘an act of extreme indulgence’.Jones added: ‘For Mr Howe there has been a decade of paraplegia without proper resolution of his claim. I cannot, however, allow my very real sympathy for him to cause me to make an order which does not reflect the applicable legal principles or to exercise discretion on that sympathy alone.’The judge said it would be difficult to allow an action to proceed when Howe has been represented since an early stage and no action was commenced within either three, five or six years – the length of time allowed by various statutes in different jurisdictions.Fieldfisher head of personal injury Jill Greenfield, who took over the case from Stewarts last year, said the lorry driver now stands to secure no compensation and potentially be hit with a six-figure legal bill. Jill GreenfieldFieldfisherShe confirmed proceedings have been issued against Stewarts Law, with the case run by senior associate Dushal Mehta and Elizabeth Ann Gumbel QC appointed as counsel.Greenfield added: ‘Mr Howe is in an incredibly difficult position. What should have been a fairly straightforward claim for compensation has ended up in the Court of Appeal ten years later.’ ‘Mr Howe, an extremely vulnerable man, has been left with no financial support for his disability following the accident and now faces a costs order against him amounting to hundreds of thousands of pounds.’Stewarts Law declined to comment as proceedings are ongoing.last_img read more

Railion recruits another member

first_imgWHILE EUROPE’s politicians wrestle with ways to introduce competition between operators (below), the national railways continue in their slow march towards a series of alliances. Earlier rumours about Danish State Railways’ freight business, DSB Gods, were confirmed on December 15 when it joined the Railion holding group formed by German Railways and Netherlands Railways. Under the deal DB holds 92% of Railion, NS Group 6% and DSB 2%.Closer co-operation with better sales and marketing are envisaged, and in the long term multi-system locos and through working of crews will allow faster and more reliable services. It is not yet clear how effective the Dutch-German alliance has been, but if it succeeds in breaking down the barriers that hinder international rail freight, it will be welcome.DB Cargo’s internal structure is set for change too, following the announcement of a fresh strategy by DB Chairman Hartmut Mehdorn in Frankfurt on November 22. Called MORA C (Market Oriented Cargo Service), it sets a target of 120 billion tonne-km in 2020 compared with the current 75 billion. Around DM5bn is being spent by 2004 on more modern motive power and wagons, improved communications and better quality control. Considerable investment is planned to develop bulk traffics, which are still seen as offering good opportunities for growth. Second string is intermodal, which Mehdorn says will be ‘central to our investment policy’; he sees ‘enormous potential’ for container services. An analysis of DB Cargo’s business found that 320 large customers generated DM4·8bn or 85% of turnover, with the other 15% spread over 7000 smaller clients which have limited growth prospects. Wagonload services are seen as no longer meeting the demands of customers, who increasingly want a full logistics package. DB is instigating a major review of what it offers smaller customers, in each case examining whether they would be served more cheaply using a non-federal railway, a container service, or a lorry taking traffic to a main terminal. DB is also reviewing its 2100 freight terminals and depots, the aim being to concentrate traffic at fewer locations. Savings of DM500m a year are expected.Further south, the planned tie-up between the freight businesses of Swiss Federal and Italian State Railways to form Cargo SI is now firmly on hold. The two railways have withdrawn their merger application to the European competition authorities in Brussels, and while they maintain that merging is still a long-term goal, it is clear that the EU requirements are more onerous than expected. Combined with the difficulties already encountered (RG 11.00 p706), the two had no option but to pull back.last_img read more

IJtram inaugurated

first_imgON MAY 28 an 8·5 km extension of the Amsterdam tram network was inaugurated by Transport Minister Karla Peijs. Known as IJtram, the line provides a connection between Amsterdam Centraal station and a new housing estate taking shape on the east side of the city.Being built on six artificial islands in the IJmeer, IJburg is one of the so called Vinex housing and urban development zones being developed under an agreement between the national ministries of Transport and Urban Planning & Environment and the local and regional authorities. This agreement requires the provision of good quality public transport services to the new housing areas from the outset to stimulate the use of public transport and to discourage car use wherever possible. For most of its 8·5 km length, IJtram runs on a fully-segregated alignment, suitable for operation at up to 70 km/h. There are nine stops, including the two termini. Mid-way along the route is a 1·8 km tunnel under the former docks of the Amsterdam port, now redeveloped. This means that the trams must be equipped with onboard safety systems to operate through the tunnel. Total cost of construction for the line is put at €174m, excluding the tunnel. Of this, 95% has come from the transport ministry.Opening of the line was originally scheduled for 2002, but was postponed because of a delay in the housing construction programme; it was feared that operating losses would be too high due to the lack of inhabitants at that time. If the housing project is fully completed as planned, the tram line is expected to carry around 50000 passengers per day from 2015.CAPTION: LEFT: Inaugural Combino 2134 is seen at the IJbuirg terminus, where a new housing zone is taking shapeRIGHT: A GVBCombino calls at Rietlandpark on June 3, close to the entrance of the 1·8 km Piet Hein tunnel Photos: Quintus Vosmanlast_img read more

Schools in Barbados to Reopen on June 8

first_img“For these sessions, secondary school principals are expected to organize schedules for half-day sessions to minimize the number of persons on the school plant at any one time and also to allow for adequate sanitizing of classrooms.” CXC has since announced that it annual examinations will be held in July. It said only those students who are contacted by their teachers will be required to attend school. Protocols for the safe reopening of schools have been devised and shared with all schools. These protocols have been developed in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and Wellness, Teacher Unions and Principal Associations. Similar visits will be made to primary schools before the scheduled return of Class Four students on Monday, June 15. The Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training (METVT) said it had been granted permission for secondary schools to re-open and all protocols will be in place to safeguard staff and students. BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – Barbados said secondary schools will reopen from June 8 to allow students to complete their Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) School-Based Assessments (SBA) and Internal Assessments for Caribbean Vocational Qualifications (CVQs). The statement said that officers from the Ministry of Health and Wellness and the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training will be visiting secondary schools with other stakeholders between June 2 and June 5, to ensure that all agreed protocols are in place. Schools were closed in March as Barbados, like other Caribbean countries, implemented measures aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) that has killed more than 370,000 people and infected 6.7 million others worldwide. CMClast_img read more

Rwanda records sharp decline in child mortality rates

first_imgRwanda has recorded a sharp decline in child mortality rates, Health Minister Diane Gashumba has said.The minister during a press conference on Thursday has said the country has witnessed a significant drop in the rates in the last decade adding that the infant mortality (children under the age of one year) rates dropped from 86 live deaths per 1,000 births in 2005 to 32 per 1,000 in the period of January 2014 to December 2015.According to the minister, mortality rates for children under the age of five also reduced from 152 to 50 deaths per 1,000 live births during the same period.The reduced numbers are attributed to the fact that 91 percent of deliveries currently take place in hospitals thanks to the improvement of health facilities and services.The poor and vulnerable groups in the country now have access to community health insurance which covers 90 percent of Rwanda’s 12 million people.last_img read more

Jamaica Government Denies Case of Coronavirus but Issues Advisory Against Travel to and From China

first_img(Caribbean360) Health authorities have sought to assure Jamaicans that there is no case of the deadly new coronavirus at the University Hospital of the West Indies.There had been reports that the hospital’s accident and emergency department was on partial shutdown as personnel treated a suspected case of the coronavirus that has left more than 130 people dead in China.However, at a press conference on Tuesday afternoon, Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton said there was no truth to the claim that there was such a case.Medical Chief of Staff at the UHWI, Dr Carl Bruce further explained that a patient, who recently travelled to China and had flu symptoms, was transferred to the UHWI from another hospital and an assessment of the individual was done “out of an abundance of caution”.However, he said, the patient who returned to Jamaica on January 14 did not exhibit symptoms of the virus, which includes a fever exceeding 30 degrees celsius.“The patient is doing well…and the university hospital will continue to do the evaluation and testing and will discharge the patient, as per our usual protocol, as soon as all those testing and evaluation are completed,” Dr Bruce said.Meantime, minister Tufton disclosed that a travel advisory was being issued for travel between Jamaica and China.“Persons in China who were planning to travel to the island are being asked to defer those plans. For those in Jamaica, who had planned on travelling to china, we are asking that they also defer their plans,” he said.“For persons in transit to Jamaica, our quarantine protocols will be put in place where persons will either be quarantined in a health facility or at home, depending on the risk assessment done.”The health minister also indicated that active surveillance would continue at Jamaica’s ports of entry. 50 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img CoronavirusInternationalNewsRegional Jamaica Government Denies Case of Coronavirus but Issues Advisory Against Travel to and From China by: – January 29, 2020 Share Sharelast_img read more